Silk Scarf Blog

6 simple ways to tie a scarf

Posted by Ginette Thibault on

There are many different scarves for many different purposes that you can play with. It takes a bit of practice to get the hang of tying scarves it but well worth the effort. Here are six common ways to tie a square silk scarf: The head wrap Fold the square scarf diagonally, forming a large triangle. Hold up the scarf and place the center on your forehead. Pull the ends to the back of your head and tie it in a single- or double knot. Adjust the wrap. The muffler Fold the scarf diagonally, forming a large triangle. Put the...

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How to wash your silk scarf

Posted by Ginette Thibault on

Tags on silk scarves often suggest dry cleaning. However, with care, you can hand wash your silk scarf with mild natural cleaning products and water: Wash Add a tiny amount non alkaline shampoo to a basin of water below 86 degrees F. Soak silk scarf in the water for a few minutes. Gently lift the scarf and plunge it up and down in the water and then move the scarf against itself to wash. Rinse Place the scarf in a basin of cold water mixed with a few drops of vinegar or lemon juice. Swish the scarf gently and move it against itself to rinse. Turn the...

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About Silk

Posted by Ginette Thibault on

When you hear the word “silk” you may think of it as one type of fabric. In reality though, silk is a blanket term that has a wide range of beautiful variations. Some popular types of silk are habotai, chiffon, georgette, organza, brocade, and taffeta. Each one has its own characteristics that make it unique. When you look for a silk scarf, there are three factors to consider about the fabric: type, weight and weave. You can have fabric made from the same source and weave it into a totally different cloth. Types of silk As stated, there are a...

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The Fascinating History of Silk

Posted by Ginette Thibault on

You may know that silk is a supple fabric with a characteristic soft luster is manufactured from fiber created biologically by moth larvae.

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